e-Horizons Project

Examining the social implications of e-Science

The e-Horizons Project conducts research on the coming breakthroughs in e-science that could have wider social and economic implications in other sectors of society.

Developments in e-science, where research is increasingly performed through large-scale online ICT networks, are creating an enormous potential for breakthroughs that enable transformations not only in scientific research in different academic, commercial and public environments, but also in the take-up of technologies in business, government and a variety of other instructional and social 'e-arenas' or contexts.

This project has now finished. The completed book "World Wide Research: Reshaping the Sciences and Humanities in the Century of Information" which is the end result of this project will available in late 2009 / early 2010 and will be available from Amazon and other good books retailers.

The e-Horizons Project conducts research on the coming breakthroughs in e-science that could have wider social and economic implications in other sectors of society.

Developments in e-science, where research is increasingly performed through large-scale online ICT networks, are creating an enormous potential for breakthroughs that enable transformations not only in scientific research in different academic, commercial and public environments, but also in the take-up of technologies in business, government and a variety of other instructional and social 'e-arenas' or contexts.

Just as the Internet was anchored in computer science developments aimed at supporting scientific research and collaboration, the coming information and communication breakthroughs could also spring from ICT innovations in this realm, for example in the Grid: global collaborations enabled by the Internet that employ very large data collections, high performance visualisations and other powerful distributed computing resources.

Improving understanding of the social dynamics that will translate these technical innovations over the next 10 to 20 years into breakthroughs in real-world contexts is at the core of this project. It is building a multidisciplinary network of engineers, computer scientists and social scientists who seek to identify and explore potential ICT breakthroughs arising at the University of Oxford and other world centres of e-science research. A key output will be a series of e-Horizons reports that will give the University of Oxford an influential role in stimulating and informing debate about ICT innovations and their societal implications.

The e-Horizons Project is a collaboration with the Oxford e-Research Centre. It is supported by and affiliated with the James Martin 21st Century School.

Book coverDirectors:

Professor William Dutton
Professor Paul Jeffreys

James Martin Fellows:

Dr Ralph Schroeder
Dr Marina Jirotka
Dr Matthijs den Besten

Publication Co-ordinator:

Miranda Turner

Publication Editor:

Malcolm Peltu