Professor Susanna-Assunta Sansone explores open data in Hong Kong

Professor Susanna-Assunta Sansone explores open data in Hong Kong

Hong Kong's research universities are producing world-class research, however, much of it is not easily accessible. This week the Centre's Professor Susanna-Assunta Sansone is exploring how to make better use of this data in a presentation to local researchers, funders and organisations, hosted by Open Data Hong Kong. Open Data Hong Kong is an open, participative, volunteer-run group of Hong Kong citizens who support Open Data, founded in March 2013. 

In the global science community, FAIR data is an initiative aiming to make data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Re-usable. With EU open science programs, the Go-FAIR initiative and the NIH Big Data 2 Knowledge program in place, the event will explore what Hong Kong needs to do to keep up with these global policy movements.

Professor Sansone and her team are in Hong Kong for the week-long workshop 'China-UK Data Dissemination in Metabolomics' (CUDDEL). This partnership between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), the universities of Birmingham, Manchester and Oxford, the Sainsbury Laboratory and the Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) with BGI and its open-access journal, GigaScience, received funding from the BBSRC to support the sharing of data and analyses in metabolomics.

The partnership extends on the recently completed BBSRC award to the University of Oxford and BGI/GigaScience which kicked off the work around data sharing in metabolomics and omics, delivering two ISA-related events: the first took place in Hong Kong in 2014 (ISA hackathon – Bring Your Own Data Party) and the second in Oxford, the following year (Hack-the-Spec–ISA as a FAIR research object). The award of £30,000 from the BBSRC will enable the consortium to host training workshops to support scientists in the UK and China in managing and sharing their metabolomics data and analyses. Such computational skills have been highlighted by the BBSRC as being essential for furthering the impact of science on society and the economy.